CIB News

On 29 October various CIB members gave shape to their intention to better coordinate their activities during the upcoming UCLG World Congress in Durban, South Africa. During a coordination call, ICLD, VVSG, VNG International,...
Local democracy and international solidarity are under stress. Local governments play a crucial role in international relations and programmes – how can we, as CIB Working Group, continue to raise awareness for the role...
CIB is launching it's video series 'Faces of the CIB', in which members share their thoughts on the added value of the CIB Working Group, and the UCLG CIB Annual Meeting in Vienna 2019 in particular. The first...

News from members

‘100 Villages’ is a new Albanian state programme that aims at establishing the first successful model on the integrated rural development of Albania. The Albanian ministries of Agriculture, Infrastructure and Energy,...
Are we making urban planning decisions for everyone? Making our cities inclusive for all, not just persons with full functional ability, is a challenge that all countries are facing. Some countries have come far in making...
Between the 19th and the 20th of September, Metropolis' new pilot project, “Tactical Urbanism”, kicked off in the City of Barcelona. Led by the Mexico City and in cooperation with Medellín, Barcelona and the...
The website of the "Development Partners Network on Decentralisation and Local Governance“ (DeLoG) network  has been relaunched! In a new, more user-friendly design we provide you with information on upcoming...
The border regions of Mali, Niger, and Libya are far out of reach of these states’ central governments. Local governance is usually in the hands of traditional authorities, such as tribal chiefs and imams. Yet the ever-increasing...

Call on members

The African Local Government Academy (ALGA) is organizing an international seminar on gender equality in Morocco, from 9-13 December. This event will be an opportunity for participants to be...
The Federation of Canadian Municipalities' Green Muncipal Fund is undertaking some research in the area of innovative climate financing models to inform the new phase of its work. Elena Pierce, Governance, Policy and Networks...
During the first months of 2020, The Hague Academy for Local Governance organizes trainings and courses to strengthen reliable local services, inclusive local policies and effective partnerships within local communities....

Publications

UNDP: Voices from the field: African experiences in producing governance, peace and security statistics

This lessons-learned brief captures and synthesizes the experiences of African national statistical offices (NSOs) in producing governance-related statistics. It will be relevant for anyone who is interested in the new statistical domain of governance, peace and security (GPS), whether to monitor SDG 16 or for any other purpose, and who is looking for guidance from those who can speak from experience. Senior government officials and chief statisticians contemplating the production of official statistics on GPS to enable national reporting on SDG 16, or on other national or regional commitments in this area, will learn from this brief what led their peers to embark on this new stream of data collection, and the strategies they used to muster political commitment and cultivate broad-based demand for GPS statistics throughout the process. Similarly, international development organizations and donors keen to support sound investments in this new area of official statistics will find in this brief a series of practical recommendations on how best to do so, offered by statisticians who were at the forefront of the SHaSA pilot on GPS statistics, many of whom have since been producing GPS statistics regularly.

Governance in the energy transition towards a low-carbon society in metropolitan areas

MEGA is an initiative of Barcelona Metropolitan Area in cooperation with Lyon Métropole and Intendencia de Montevideo and partly funded by Metropolis through its pilot projects program. The aim of MEGA is to exchange knowledge on how metropolitan areas address governance in the energy transition process towards a low-carbon society. The project was launched in June 2017 and finished in July 2019.

ODI: Rethinking capacity and complementarity for a more local humanitarian action

The Overseas Development Institute's newest report (by Veronique Barbelet) explores capacity and complemantrity within local humanitarian action. Humanitarian action has been a mainly international endeavour, where power continues to lie with donors, UN agencies and large INGOs. This led to a call at the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016 for humanitarian action to be as ‘local as possible, as international as necessary’, which has inspired numerous debates and initiatives, including the Grand Bargain. Among the challenges to a more local humanitarian action have been two central issues: capacity and complementarity. On the one hand, international and national actors have called for more recognition of existing local capacity and support to strengthen it – through more direct and better-quality funding as well as investment in capacity strengthening. On the other hand, some international actors (including donors) have voiced concerns over a lack of local capacity in many contexts. In the localisation debate, there is a growing discourse calling for a new division of labour between local and international actors, in order to bring about greater complementarity, which is primarily concerned with rebalancing power relations in the humanitarian sector. To better inform humanitarian action that is as local as possible and as international as necessary, the Humanitarian Policy Group at Overseas Development Institute launched a two-year research project on capacity and complementarity in 2017. The project explored two central questions: How can capacity be better understood and applied to support more complementary and collaborative humanitarian responses? What are the opportunities for and obstacles to harnessing the capacity of and forging more effective complementarity among local, national, regional and international actors responding to humanitarian crises? The report [attached] draws on research conducted during the project, including an initial paper reviewing literature and practice that provides a diagnosis of current challenges; a case study on the response to the Rohingya refugee crisis in Bangladesh, which delves deeper into questions of localisation in a refugee context; and a case study on the humanitarian response to conflicts in South Kivu and Kasai Central in the Democratic Republic of Congo, which looks at capacity and complementarity in protracted and emerging conflict contexts. Author: Veronique Barbelet, Senior Research Fellow with the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). Source: ODI